Four Ways to Alexander Awareness

I was just looking through some articles at The Complete Guide to the Alexander Technique, a comprehensive site for all your AT needs, and I found this description of it:
The Alexander Technique is a way of learning to move mindfully through life. The Alexander process shines a light on inefficient habits of movement and patterns of accumulated tension, which interfere with our innate ability to move easily and according to how we are designed. It’s a simple yet powerful approach that offers the opportunity to take charge of one’s own learning and healing process, because it’s not a series of passive treatments but an active exploration that changes the way one thinks and responds in activity. It produces a skill set that can be applied in every situation. Lessons leave one feeling lighter, freer, and more grounded.
I recognized it as something I wrote for an earlier version of the Way Opens website, and I must admit, it’s pretty good. Yet I began to wonder how “a skill set that can be applied in every situation,” might sound to someone unfamiliar with the work. It’s a pretty big claim. Every situation? Really?

Yes, really, because Alexander work teaches a way of being, in the same way that practicing meditation creates new ways to be in relationship with reality.

But that’s rather vague, isn’t it? What do I mean, how does it get applied, in what situations might it be most effective? Here are four basic positions we all find ourselves in every day, and they are wonderful ways to use Alexander awareness:

  1. Walking — When you walk, pay attention to the relationship of your head to your pelvis. They are connected by your spine. Does your head weight fall forward as you walk, dragging the rest of your body behind it? Or perhaps the opposite — you do that “chin up” thing which pulls the head weight back and down and your neck gets crunched. Your head can be easily poised atop the spine, remaining aligned with your pelvis below, as your feet and legs do the work of moving you forward through space. Are you in your body as you walk, or disconnected and striving to reach a future destination? Alexander Technique keeps you in the present moment, step by step. When you’re aware of what you are doing, you are applying the AT.
  2. Standing — Notice how the weight is supported by your feet. Is it evenly distributed between both feet (if you’re like me, you have a habit of leaning on one leg more than the other). Is the weight more on your heels or on the balls of the feet, rolling toward the inside edges or the outsides? Let the soles of your feet release into the ground underneath you. How much tension can you let go of in your legs without collapsing? Unlock your knees and let them be soft and ready to bend. Check in with your hip joints (not the bones that stick out on each side, but the joints where the legs meet the torso). Notice how the legs rise up to support your torso, and — without using muscle force — allow a sense of upward flow from your tailbone to the crown of your head. As with walking, investigate the alignment of your head with your pelvis. Letting go and investigating what happens is practicing the Alexander Technique.
  3. Sitting — My Alexander teacher, Alan Katz, says that “sitting is standing in another position.” He means that the same sort of thinking applies when we sit as when we stand. The sitz bones at the base of the pelvis are shaped like the rockers on a rocking chair. So when you sit, you can be leaning backwards or forwards on the little rockers, or you can be balanced at the center of these wonderful bones. Isn’t it helpful that we have some nice padding here? You can rock back and forth a bit until you find center. Then allow that upward flow through your spine, making sure to see how your head and pelvis are aligned. When you access the support of your bones and make some choices about movement and balance, that’s applied AT.
  4. Lying Down — There is a whole procedure called “Constructive Rest” for this. You can listen to a guided experience of it.

    If you don’t want to do that, you can simply remember to take a few minutes when you lie down to consciously release your weight into the support underneath you. It’s amazing how muscles and body shapes hold on, even when we are not contending with gravity anymore. It’s like we have to remind our bodies that they can let go. “Hey, this is rest, remember? Stop working!” When you talk to yourself like this, with care and patience, it’s Alexander practice.

There is so much more to be aware of in these four basic everyday activities (which also happen to be the four positions for meditation). Of course, it’s in the transition from one to another where we really tend to get into some strange and unhelpful ways of moving, but even if you have never had an Alexander lesson, you can test what I’ve described here, and see for yourself. Then find a teacher (me, maybe) to help you understand what you discover.


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