Heel Thyself

Someone recently asked me what is the most frequent instruction I give my Alexander students. “That’s easy,” I replied. “I ask them to pause, and then notice.” True as this is, my friend was not satisfied. She really wanted to know what physical habits of posture or use I see most often, and what I teach my students to address these issues. This is not as easy to answer, because everyone is different. But like any AT teacher, I typically see a lot of locked knees, shallow breathing, head/spine misalignment, tight jaws, and generally overworked muscles accompanied by low-level anxiety.

Heels

Photo: Joanne Clapp Fullagar

One common misunderstanding I’ve seen in nearly everybody involves the heels. I’m grateful that my own teacher emphasized heel structure over and over again, because most of us think of our heels as being under the ankle joint. While it is true that the heel is below the ankle, it’s crucial to understand that it is also behind the joint. The calcaneus bone (the one that gives the heel its distinctive shape) functions like the kickstand on a bike: it extends at an angle down and out away from the ankle joint. Alignment and balance depend on this, and it is essential for free movement of the ankle joint, which in turn makes the knees less rigid and the hips open up more powerfully (everything’s connected).

Heels provide stability in standing as well as walking, and certainly make it possible to “release up,” as AT encourages us to allow. Sensing into center (the middle of the pelvic bowl), I feel my sitz bones drop toward my heels. Feeling the connection to the earth through my heels, I can let go and sense how the back of my head is supported all the way from the ground up.

Why so many students with a misuse of their heels? Shoes are a likely culprit. Most shoes have heels, even low ones. Heels were added to shoes because people used to ride horses, and shoe heels kept feet in the stirrups. There’s not a good reason for them today, except that we have become accustomed to the shape they make when we wear them: they push up the back of the pelvis, emphasizing the buttocks, and they tend to make calves more shapely. This has become the fashion. Heels, especially high heels, do damage over time, forcing the knees to lock, the weight to press into the balls and toes of the feet, over-arching the lower back, and throwing everything out of alignment, including the head and neck.

That’s why I rarely wear high heels anymore, and I advise my students to avoid them whenever possible. Yes, it’s fun to wear kicks that elevate, especially if you’re short like I am. There’s a brief experience of sexy power that I’ve been conditioned to appreciate, but the discomfort always wins out, and the lack of balance and extra work that high heels force on my body is just not worth it. The only time I enjoy seeing spike heels on anyone is when they are worn in solidarity, like these Toronto gentlemen did:TorontoWalkAMileInHerShoesParadeAnother reason folks seem not to access the support of their heels is that we are all leaning forward a lot, even when we’re slouching and pulling down. This is a kind of “leaning in” that should be avoided, as it is an indicator of what F. M. Alexander called end-gaining. In a hurry to “get ‘er done,” we forge ahead without thinking, unaware of the strain as we push and pull into whatever’s next. We literally get ahead of ourselves.

Next time you’re in line somewhere, or standing around bored at a party or your kid’s T-ball game, pause and notice (see what I did there?):

  • Are you accessing the support of your heels beneath you?
  • Is the weight evenly distributed across the soles of your feet?
  • Is it possible to let go in the arch of your lower back and let your tailbone hang?
  • Can you feel a connection up to the back of your head?

If this makes sense and helps, or especially if it doesn’t, consider taking some Alexander lessons. You might enjoy getting to know those little kickstands behind and below your ankles.


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